Browsing Categories and Tags Using a Web Address

Earlier, you saw how the Categories widget lets you retrieve a list of posts for any
category. For example, click the Herbal Tea link and—presto!—you see the posts
about brewing your favorite dried leaves.
WordPress works this category-browsing magic using a specific form of web address.
If you understand it, then you can use category web addresses yourself, wherever
you need them. First, you start with the site address:
http://magicteahouse.net
Then, you add /category/ to the end of the address, like this:
http://magicteahouse.net/category/
Finally, you add the bit that identifies the category you want to use. If you use the
default permalink style on a self-hosted site, you get awkward category web addresses
that incorporate the category ID:
http://magicteahouse.net/category/?cat=6
But if you use pretty permalinks, life is much better. Then, instead of embedding
the category ID, category web addresses use the much more readable category
slug, like this:
http://magicteahouse.net/category/herbal-tea
WordPress cooks up the slug based on your category name, using the same process
it follows to pick the slug for a new post. First, WordPress replaces every uppercase
letter with a lowercase one. Next, it replaces spaces with hyphens (-). Lastly, it strips
out forbidden special characters, if you used them. As a result, the category Herbal
Tea gets the slug herbal-tea.
Remember, you can modify the slug for every category using the Categories page
(page 113). For example, you can shorten the address shown above by replacing
herbal-tea with the simpler slug herbal.
Tags work the same way as categories, except the /category/ portion of the web
address becomes /tag/. So, to browse the posts that use a specific tag, you need
an address like this:
http://magicteahouse.net/tags/kuala-lumpur
You can tweak tag slugs in the Tags page. However, it’s far less common to tailor
tag slugs than it is to edit post and category slugs.

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Browsing Categories and Tags Using a Web Address

Tags guidelines

Tags are often more specific than categories. For example, if you write a review of
a movie, you might use Movie Reviews as your category and the movie and director’s
name as tags.
Follow these guidelines when you use tags:
Don’t over-tag. Instead, choose the best five to 10 tags for your content. If you
use WordPress.com and you create a post with 15 tags or more, it’s much less
likely to appear in the WordPress.com tag cloud (page 41), which means new
visitors are less likely to stumble across your blog.
Keep your tags short and precise. Pick “Grateful Dead” over “Grateful Dead
Concerts.”
Reuse your tags on different posts. Once you pick a good tag, put it to work
wherever it applies. After all, tags are designed to help people find related
posts. And never create a similarly named tag for the same topic. For example,
if you decide to add the tag “New York Condos,” and then you use the tags “NY
Condos” and “Condo Market,” you’ve created three completely separate tags
that won’t share the same posts.
Consider using popular tags. If you’re on WordPress.com, check out popularly
used tags (page 39) and consider using them in your posts, when they apply.
If you’re trying to attract search engine traffic, you might consider using hot
search keywords for your tags (page 448).
Don’t duplicate your category with a tag of the same name. That’s because
WordPress treats categories and tags in a similar way, as bits of information
that describe a post. Duplicating a category with a tag is just a waste of a tag.

Tags guidelines